HISTORY

The Corriedale (Kor'-e-Dal) breed simultaneously evolved in both Australia and New Zealand in the late 1800’s through selective breeding of offspring from pure Merino Dams crossed with Lincoln or Leicester rams. The breed was developed to meet a demand for a dual purpose animal; one with good meat characteristics and good commercial wool production.
The breed is now distributed worldwide, making up the greatest population of all sheep in South America and it thrives throughout Asia, North America and South Africa. Its popularity now suggests it is the second most significant breed in the world after Merinos.

In 1914, 65 ewes and 10 rams were imported to a government experiment station in Wyoming. This was the beginning of the Corriedale sheep in the United States. Since that time Corriedales have gained steadily in popularity in the US. In fact, Corriedales rank high in popularity in many nations and are considered to be the second most numerous breed worldwide.

FLEECE

The Corriedale produces bulky, high-yielding wool ranging from 31.5 to 24.5 micron fiber diameter. The fleece from mature ewes will weigh from 10 to 17 pounds (4.5-7.7 kg) with a staple length of 3.5 to 6 inches (9-15 cm).  The yield percent of the fleece (washed wool yield) ranges from 50 to 60 percent of raw fleece weight.

MEAT

Corriedales are well known for their ability to produce high quality meat, especially for the prime lamb trade. Good length of carcass and muscling provides lean lambs for slaughter at an early age, or at a later age for heavyweight lamb grades.

BREEDING

Corriedales are excellent, extremely sound mothers with high fertility. They are capable of lamb survival rates of up to 140%. Time and time again, in purebred and crossbred flocks, they have proved their ability to raise productive, healthy lambs.

2017 FEATURED BREED

CORRIEDALE

BREED CHARACTERISTICS

The Corriedale is a large framed, plain bodied, polled (without horns) sheep, capable of producing heavy carcasses of lamb, hogget or mutton as well as wonderful fleeces. Corriedales also produce heavy cutting bright fleeces, with good style, length and handle. Mean fibre diameter ranges from 25 to 30 microns in adult sheep to the low 20's in lambs and hoggets. The wool is also in demand for hand spinning.

Corriedales adapt to a wide range of climatic conditions, sometimes at very high altitudes, and are known to be "good doers" in poor seasons and have a strong constitution. Mature rams will weigh from 175 to 275 pounds (79-125 kg), ewe weights range from 130 to 180 pounds (59-81 kg).

Corriedales are known for their ability to forage under a variety of climatic conditions. Corriedales are hardy animals and well suited to a variety of higher rainfall environments.